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Data and Long-Term Monitoring

Aleutian Arc Geothermal Fluids: Chemical Analyses of Water and Gas Samples Collected During Volcano Hazards Investigations
Aleutian Arc Geothermal Fluids

http://water.usgs.gov/nrp/aleutian-arc-geothermal-fluids/
As part of ongoing efforts by the Alaska Volcano Observatory to study and monitor volcanoes of the Aleutian Arc, samples of water and gas are occasionally collected from thermal springs, fumaroles, gas vents, and other features scattered throughout the arc. These samples are analyzed in one or more USGS labs. Some of the analytical results are eventually included in publications that summarize the field work or present major conclusions, but some data remains unpublished. This site contains the chemical and isotopic data from thermal waters and gases collected from the Aleutian Arc over the past 15 years, where such data remains unpublished or only published in part.

Hydrothermal Monitoring Data from the Cascade Range
Hydrothermal Monitoring Data from the Cascade Range

http://water.usgs.gov/nrp/cascade-hydrothermal-monitoring/
Hydrothermal Monitoring Data from the Cascade Range database serves as a repository for hydrothermal-monitoring data collected at 25 sites in the U.S. portion of the Cascade Range volcanic arc. These data are intended to quantify baseline hydrothermal variability at most (10 of 12) of the highest-risk volcanoes in the Cascades, as defined by the U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS’) National Volcanic Early Warning System (NVEWS) report.

Powder River: Data for Cross-Channel Profiles
Powder River: Data for Cross-Channel Profiles

http://wwwbrr.cr.usgs.gov/projects/GEOMORPH_Powder_River/
Powder River rises in the Bighorn Mountains of Wyoming and flows northward through a semi-arid landscape in Wyoming and Montana to the Yellowstone River. The river has no dams or other large-scale human modifications, which, combined with its substantial suspended-sediment load, makes it an optimal outdoor laboratory for studying natural fluvial processes. A research program was started in 1975 and, by 1977, 20 channel cross sections had been established in the 93-km reach. Forty years worth of data are now available for these cross sections (1975 to the present).

Trace Metals in San Francisco Bay Clams
Trace Metals in San Francisco Bay Clams

http://water.usgs.gov/nrp/trace-metals-in-clams/
The clams Potamocorbula amurensis and Corbicula fluminea were collected at a variety of sites in the San Francisco Bay/Delta beginning July 1990 and ending February 2010. Both clams are invasive species in the San Francisco Bay/Delta and were used as biosentinels of the fate, transport and effects of trace metals in the San Francisco Bay ecosystem. The trace metals analysed were silver (Ag), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), vanadium (V) and zinc (Zn).

USGS Blue Carbon Projects
USGS Blue Carbon Projects

http://water.usgs.gov/nrp/blue-carbon/
Together with partner organizations, the USGS is involved in data collection, analysis and synthesis to improve estimates of coastal wetland carbon fluxes. Targeted research efforts in this area will help improve science and data availability on ecosystem-specific emission factors and sequestration rates; effects of activities (e.g. land management actions); and effects of, and response to, sea level rise.

Water Chemistry Data for Selected Springs, Geysers, and Streams in Yellowstone National Park
Water Chemistry Data, Yellowstone National Park

http://water.usgs.gov/nrp/yellowstone-water-chemistry/
Water analyses are reported for numerous thermal and non-thermal features in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) beginning in 2009. Water samples were collected and analyzed for major and trace constituents from 19 thermal areas of YNP: Amphitheater Springs area, Nymph Lake area, West Nymph Creek Thermal Area, Norris Geyser Basin, Chocolate Pots, Gibbon Geyser Basin (including Geyser Springs Group, Sylvan Spring area, and Monument Geyser Basin), Secret Valley Hot Springs, Lower Geyser Basin, Upper Geyser Basin, Lone Star Geyser area, Forest Springs area, Crater Hills area, Mud Volcano area, and Snake Hot Springs area.

Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Budgets Program: Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico
Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Budgets Program: Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico

http://water.usgs.gov/nrp/luquillo/
The Luquillo WEBB Project is set in a mountainous, humid-tropical environment in and adjacent to the El Yunque National Forest in eastern Puerto Rico. Since 1991, WEBB researchers here have studied the effects of geology, land use, atmospheric pollution, drought, and rainfall patterns on hydrology, water quality, and landslide events.

Water Quality of San Francisco Bay
Water Quality of San Francisco Bay

http://sfbay.wr.usgs.gov/access/wqdata/
Since 1968 the U.S. Geological Survey has maintained a program of research and observation in San Francisco Bay. The program includes regular measurements of water quality along a 145 kilometer transect spanning the length of the entire estuarine system. The Water Quality of San Francisco Bay website describes the measurement program, displays results of water quality measurements, and makes the full data set available to all interested users.

Water Quality in the Yukon River Basin in Alaska and Canada
Water Quality in the Yukon River Basin, Alaska and Canada

http://wwwbrr.cr.usgs.gov/projects/SWC_Yukon/YukonRiverBasin/
Since 2006 the USGS National Research Program and Yukon River Inter-Tribal Watershed Council (YRITWC) have been partnering to collect water-quality samples from the Yukon River and tributaries with the assistance of trained community members living in the Yukon River Basin. The YRITWC provides support for this project through sample collection, sample processing and shipment logistics with communities and the USGS. The USGS provides water analysis and data interpretation support. Through this partnership over 300 community members have been trained in water sample collection, which resulted in over 1500 samples collected at 50 sites covering the entire 2,300 mile reach of the Yukon River since the program began. This program has allowed the USGS to create and maintain a baseline record of water-quality in the river basin, critical for understanding climate change impacts. Furthermore, this successful program increased local capacity by involving local Indigenous citizens of the river basin in establishing water quality programs and assisted in translating scientific results to the communities that rely on the river.