National Research Program | Climate and Disturbance Impacts on Hydrologic Processes

People

Michelle A. Walvoord
Michelle A. Walvoord

Research Hydrologist

Contact: walvoord@usgs.gov | 303-236-4998
Education:
Ph.D. in Earth and Environmental Science, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology
M.S. in Hydrology, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology
B.A. in Geology, Hamilton College

https://www.usgs.gov/staff-profiles/michelle-ann-walvoord
http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Michelle_Walvoord
http://scholar.google.com/citations?user=CaJCalsAAAAJ&hl=en

My primary research activities focus on understanding climate change impacts on hydrologic systems in northern latitudes. Specifically, I am interested in (1) identifying vulnerabilities to permafrost thaw with respect to water fluxes, flowpaths, and distribution at local to basin scales and (2) examining these hydrologic perturbations in the context of carbon cycling. I also investigate transport of water, gas, and solutes through the unsaturated zone in arid and semiarid environments to better understand controls on recharge and contaminant transport processes. To address scientific questions related to these research topics, I rely on integrating field and modeling approaches from multiple disciplines including hydrology, biogeochemistry, geophysics, and remote sensing.

Brian A. Ebel
Brian A. Ebel

Research Hydrologist

Contact: bebel@usgs.gov | 303-236-3977
Education:
Ph.D. in Hydrogeology, Stanford University
B.A. in Earth and Planetary Sciences, Washington University

https://www.usgs.gov/staff-profiles/michelle-ann-walvoord
http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Brian_Ebel
http://scholar.google.com/citations?user=nkSdY8gAAAAJ&hl=en

My research is focused on understanding how landscape disturbances (e.g. forestry, wildfire, agriculture, and vegetation mortality) affect water availability, water quality, and vulnerability to natural hazards. My work crosses traditional disciplinary boundaries and integrates hillslope hydrology, unsaturated porous media physics, geomorphology, and ecology. I design and conduct studies on the effects of landscape disturbance on hydrologic processes at plot to watershed scales using field and laboratory measurements in concert with numerical modeling. An additional focus of my research is characterizing the broad linkages between changing climate, landscape disturbances, and the physical hydrology of permafrost systems.

James A. Tindall
James A. Tindall

Research Hydrologist

Contact: jtindall@usgs.gov | 303-236-5005
Education:
Ph.D. Physics and Engineering, University of Georgia
M.A. International and Homeland Security Studies, United States Naval Postgraduate School
M.S. Soil Science and Statistics, Brigham Young University
B.S. Agronomy and Soils and Computer Science, Brigham Young University

https://www.usgs.gov/staff-profiles/james-tindall

Having worked in unsaturated zone hydrology for two decades, the scope of my research has expanded to involve the water-energy-food nexus (WEFN). My interest lies in the interdependencies of WEFN to include solutions for critical global-resource issues and strategic sustainability as a nation involving water, energy, and agriculture/food, as well as related areas and problems for population sustainability, which crosses all USGS mission areas. The work naturally embraces forecasting resource changes and security strategies (sustainability and resiliency) that are scalable and are especially related to the economic effects, environmental systems and water supply and sustainability, public health and emerging technologies. The work requires an interdisciplinary approach involving innovation and collaboration to analyze water-related technical and related data and processes.