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WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH GRANT PROPOSAL

Project ID: 2002TX63B

Title: The Role of Suspended Clays in Phosphrus Processing by Lotic Periphyton

Project Type: Research

Focus Categories: Surface Water, Water Quality, Nutrients

Keywords: water quality, reservoir-watershed landscape, periphyton, clay, nutrient processing

Start Date: 03/01/2002

End Date: 02/01/2003

Federal Funds: $5,000

Non-Federal Matching Funds: $10,000

Congressional District: 11th

Principal Investigators:
June E. Wolfe III
Baylor University

Owen T. Lind
Baylor University

Abstract

Throughout much of Texas, human activities have increased nutrient and sediment loadings to reservoirs, thus presenting water quality problems. When increased sediment loads contain significant amounts of clay, they interfere with the ability of biological organisms such as attached algae, bacteria, and protozoans to effectively filter nutrients.

Throughout much of Texas, human activities have increased nutrient and sediment loadings to reservoirs, thus presenting water quality problems. When increased sediment loads contain significant amounts of clay, they interfere with the ability of biological organisms such as attached algae, bacteria, and protozoans to effectively filter nutrients.

Studies will be carried out in simulated streams within controlled greenhouse environments at the Blackland Research Center at Temple, Texas. These simulated streams will be "seeded" with benthic organisms from local streams and will be established over a period of 4 to 6 weeks. These "cultured" organisms within these artificial streams will be exposed to a variety of artificially imposed conditions, including variations of light, pH, streamflows, and clay loads. The mass balance of phosphorus will be obtained on a regular basis.

The anticipated outcome of this project will be to provide information on the role of clay particles and periphyton play in the nutrient cycling process that affects surface water quality. Results will yield considerable insights into water quality and nutrient issues likely to be encountered in watersheds with widespread clay soils.

Progress/Completion Report PDF


U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey
URL: http://water.usgs.gov/wrri/02grants/2002TX63B.html
Maintained by: John Schefter
Last Updated: Thursday June 24, 2004 3:18 PM
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