National Science and Technology Council's Committee on Environment and Natural Resources

Subcommittee on Water Availability and Quality



CENRS Subcommittee on Water Availability and Quality — Publications and Reports

Selected reports and publications from the Subcommittee:

Strengthening the Scientific Understanding of Climate Change Impacts on Freshwater Resources of the United States, August 2011

Strengthening the Scientific Understanding of Climate Change Impacts on Freshwater Resources of the United States, August 2011

This report responds to the requirements of Section 9506 of the Omnibus Public Lands Act [Public Law (PL) 111-11; Appendix A] calling for a report to Congress that describes the impacts of global climate change on freshwater resources of the United States, and identifies key actions to improve the Nation's capacity to detect and predict changes in freshwater resources that are likely to result from a changing climate. The steps described in the report are intended to help decision-makers and water resource managers by facilitating... Download full report (13.4MB PDF)

A Strategy for Federal Science and Technology to Support Fresh Water Availability in the United States, September 2007

A Strategy for Federal Science and Technology to Support Fresh Water Availability in the United States, September 2007

The National Science and Technology Council (NSTC) establishes national guidelines for Federal science and technology investments. Under the NSTC’s Committee on Environment and Natural Resources is the Subcommittee on Water Availability and Quality (SWAQ), which is made up of 25 Federal agencies that collectively are responsible for all aspects of Federal water research and/or water resource management.

The Directors of the Office of Science and Technology Policy and the Office of Management and Budget, in their August 12, 2004, joint memorandum, requested Federal agencies, through the NSTC, to... Download full report (3.3MB PDF)

Science and Technology to Support Fresh Water Availability in the United States, November 2004

Millions of Americans whose water is supplied by a public utility turn on their water faucets each day without a thought about where their water comes from. Those who are served by individual domestic wells may be more conscious of where their water comes from. However, most people rarely think about not having enough water for daily activities, unless power is interrupted, or a prolonged drought results in restrictions on water use, or a well becomes dry. Those same citizens may be aware that... Download full report (14MB PDF)

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