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Water Questions & Answers
How does water get to my home?

Water tower in Gaffney, South Carolina that was built to look like a giant peach.Let's assume that you get your water from the local water department through pipes buried below the streets. In other words, you don't have your own well in your back yard. Chances are that you get your water through the magic of gravity and pumps. Cities and towns build those big water towers on top of the highest hills and then fill them with water. So even if you live on a hill, there's a good chance the water tower is higher than your house. Water moves from the tower, due to gravity, and goes down a large pipe from the tower and then through an intricate network of pipes that eventually reach your house.

Although gravity supplies the power to move water from the tower to peoples' homes, electricity is needed to run a pump to push water from the source into the tower. Although water can be delivered to pipes going to homes directly from the pump, the water tower is needed for periods of the day when demand exceeds the supply the pump can deliver. These water towers are often designed to hold the amount of water needed for a day's worth of use by the customers.

You've probably passed by so many water towers that you just ignore them, but they are an essential mechanism for getting water to your faucets and tomato plants. Normally water towers are painted white and are just big cylinders on top of a tall tube. But there is no law saying a town can't try to make their water tower into a tourist attraction, as Gaffney, South Carolina has done. "The Giant Peach" water tower in Gaffney is a well known landmark that supplies the town with water. It is 150 feet tall and holds 1 million gallons of water.

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Page Last Modified: Monday, 17-Mar-2014 11:03:31 EDT