In Reply Refer To:

Mail Stop 412                                                                                                    January 10, 2002

 

Office of Water Quality Technical Memorandum 2002.07

Subject: National Stream Quality Accounting Network, Fiscal Year (FY) 2002

This memorandum contains a summary of the activities of the National Stream Quality Accounting Network (NASQAN) for FY 2002, including the stations being operated, constituents measured, and special studies that are being conducted in each basin. Further details on NASQAN operations can be obtained from either the National Coordinator or the Basin Coordinators. Contact information is contained at the end of this memorandum.

NASQAN Stations

The stations to be operated this year are shown in Figure 1. Only minor adjustments to the station configuration were made this year. In the Mississippi Basin, the Cumberland R. at Smithfield was added to better characterize the water quality of tributaries in the lower Ohio. Past data has indicated a large source of pesticides in the lower Ohio, presumably from either the Cumberland or Green Rivers. The station cost was partially supported by reducing sampling frequency on the Tennessee River. The station Mississippi River at Graton, IL, which was partially supported by NASQAN in the past, will revert to a station operated solely by the cooperative program in Missouri District. Also, plans are being made at this time to establish a “super gage” at Baton Rouge, Louisiana to replace the historical monitoring site at St. Francisville, in support of Tulane University’s Lower Estuary Assessment Group.  In the Rio Grande, NASQAN assumed a greater portion of the cost of operating the Rio Grande below Presidio, TX site (in Big Bend National Park). National Park Service personnel will continue to collect samples at this site. The number of stations operated in each basin is shown in Table 1.

Table 1. Number of NASQAN stations by river basin.

Basin

Number of Stations

Mississippi

17

Rio Grande

8

Colorado

2

Columbia

1

Yukon

5

Total

33

The complete listing of stations, along with number of samples to be collected, is contained in Attachment 1. As in past years, most stations have a portion of their sample collections determined by calendar date (“fixed samples”) and a portion determined by hydrologic condition (“event samples”). Collection cost for fixed samples are paid at the beginning of the year. The cost of event samples is paid after sample collection in a secondary funding transfer in July. The initial transfers and event reserve amounts, by station and by account number, are contained in Attachment 2.



Constituents Measured

Constituents measured at NASQAN stations vary somewhat across the country depending on local conditions. Major ions and nutrients (including carbon species) are measured at all NASQAN stations. Both dissolved and sediment-associated trace elements were measured at many stations in the Colorado, Columbia, Mississippi, and Rio Grande basins during 1996-2000; sampling for these constituents continues only at stations that were not well sampled during this period (including new stations in these basins and in the Yukon basin) and at a subset of stations in these basin at a reduced frequency. Pesticides (NWQL Schedule 2001) are measured throughout the Mississippi and Rio Grande basins; but are not measured in the Yukon basin. Radiochemistry is measured in the Colorado and Yukon basins.

Special Studies

Mississippi Basin

The water-quality issues in the Mississippi River Basin are complex and varied, including changing the operation of the dams on the Missouri River to provide habit for endangered species, survival of the mussel population during the building of a lock and dam on the lower Ohio River and the effects of the Spring 2001 upper Mississippi River flood. Currently, the most prominent water-quality issue in the Mississippi River Basin, on a national scale, is the hypoxic waters that form near shore in the Gulf of Mexico each summer. The areal extent of these hypoxic waters in July 2001 was about 8,000 square miles; this is the maximum extent recorded since record keeping began in the early 1980’s. Some researchers relate the increase in nitrogen being discharged from the Mississippi River over the past 50 years to the growth and severity of these hypoxic waters. Although, the NASQAN program will not answer the question of whether the increased nitrogen exacerbates the hypoxic waters, the program with its flux-based approach will provide information on source areas for nutrients and document any changes in the transport of nutrients that might occur in an effort to control the hypoxic zone.

During FY 2002, the following special studies will continue in the Mississippi Basin:

·         Stable Isotopes --The stable isotopic content of C, N, and S of particulate organic matter will be measured by Carol Kendall (NRP-WR). Preliminary data indicate that the POM may have a planktonic source, contrary to what was previously assumed. To test this hypothesis, chlorophyll-a will also be measured in the Mississippi Basin. (NASQAN contributes $20,000 for partial payment of lab analyses.)

·         Tritium -- Samples will be collected for tritium analysis for Robert Michel (NRP, WR) at 3 stations (Ohio R. @ Cannelton Dam; Mississippi R. @ St. Francisville; Missouri R. @ Omaha). (NRP-WR at no cost to NASQAN)

·         Time of travel – In FY 2002 an effort will be made to gather the literature on the time of travel of a parcel of water in the Mississippi River Basin with an emphasis on the big rivers. This is prior to conducting new time of travel studies of the Mississippi River system. (Richard Rebich, MS District; $15,000)

·         Cumberland River – The calculation of constituent yields in the lower Ohio River has shown some results, which are counter-intuitive. One of the areas of interest is the Tennessee-Cumberland system. Prior to 2001 only the Tennessee River was sampled and the yields for the Cumberland River were calculated by difference. Beginning in FY 2002 the Cumberland River near the confluence of the Ohio River will be added as a NASQAN station.

·         LTRMP—NASQAN will be working during FY02 with BRD’s Long Term Resource Monitoring Program to ensure data comparability. A joint analysis of NASQAN, NAWQA, Co-op and LTRMP data is being explored to describe the water-quality effects of the spring 2001 flooding in the upper Mississippi River Basin. (Richard Coupe, Miss. Basin Coordinator, MS District; and Steve Kahlkoff, IA District, $20,000)

·         Pool 8 GW/SW Interaction—Randy Hunt (WI District) will complete a multi-year study on groundwater/surface water interaction at Pool 8 on the Mississippi done in cooperation with BRD-LTRM (Onalaska, WI) and NRP-WR on nutrient budgets and processing in this navigation pool of the upper Mississippi River. ($20,000)

·         Establishment of Baton Rouge “Supergage”—During FY02, NASQAN sampling will transition from the historical location at St. Francisville, LA to a new gage at Baton Rouge, LA that will include real-time water-quality monitoring. This activity is in support of Tulane University’s Lower Estuary Assessment Group. (Support for this activity is from the Toxics Program and by transferring resources from St. Francisville gage to new gage at Baton Rouge.)

·         Lower Valley Synoptic Sampling. Plans are being made to conduct a one-time synoptic sampling of major tributaries and historic NASQAN stations from Memphis, TN to Vicksburg, MS to assess the contribution of lower valley directly rather than by difference between the loadings measured at St. Francisville and Melville and those measured at Thebes and Grand Chain. Sampling will be done in cooperation with NAWQA Mississippi Embayments Study Unit. (AR District, MS District, LA District, and Richard Coupe, $35,000)

·         Modeling size and volume of hypoxic zone—Bill Battaglin (CO District) will work with Nancy Rabalais (Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium (LUMCON)) on determining volume (rather than just area) of hypoxic zone and explore the relation between this volume and nutrient loadings. ($37,000)

Rio Grande Basin

The Rio Grande forms the boundary between Mexico and the United States in Texas and often is the sole source of water for a number of communities on both sides of the border and a source of habitat for wildlife and endangered species.  The region is mostly arid to semiarid and flow is controlled by numerous reservoirs in the basin.  On the mainstem of the Rio Grande, Amistad International Reservoir and Falcon International Reservoir serve to subdivide the Rio Grande into discrete river systems with unique hydrologic, geologic, and chemical characteristics.

The NASQAN fixed-station network will continue to collect data from the eight (8) stations monitored in FY 2001: Rio Grande near Presidio (08374200), Rio Grande at Foster Ranch (08377200), Pecos River near Langtry (08447410), Rio Grande below Amistad Dam (08450900), Rio Grande near Laredo (08459200), Rio Grande below Falcon Dam (08461300), Arroyo Colorado near Harlingen (08470400), and Rio Grande near Brownsville (08475000). The goal of the fixed-network is to continue to collect samples using a flux-based approach over a range in stage. Sampling will be done on a routine basis at the eight (8) stations located in the middle and lower portions of the Rio Grande watershed because of infrequent storm events in the basin. Although sampling is planned on a regular basis, efforts will be made to sample at higher stages and during storm events if they occur. Samples from the upper Rio Grande watershed near El Paso will continue to be collected as part of the NAWQA program. In FY 2002, NASQAN will take on a greater role in sampling at the Rio Grande near Presidio site.  This site, operated in cooperation with the National Park Service at Big Bend National Park, provides information on water quality downstream of the confluence of the Rio Conchos with the Rio Grande.  The Rio Conchos is the largest freshwater inflow to the Rio Grande in Texas and inflow from the river has historically dominated flow in the middle Rio Grande Basin during the summer rainy season.  In the Rio Conchos watershed, expanding agricultural, mining, and timber harvesting activities as well as urban and industrial development affect both the quantity and quality of the Rio Grande. For the lower Rio Grande basin, flow at the Rio Grande at Brownsville site (08475000) will be sampled on an event-only basis.  Because of reduced flows in the Rio Grande resulting from the construction of a low-water dam and reduced inflows from tributaries, the Rio Grande flows into the Gulf of Mexico generally only during higher flows and most of the time a sample cannot be collected at the Brownsville site.  Most of the base flow from the Lower Valley is diverted into the Arroyo Colorado and is discharged into the Laguna Madre.  During FY2002, NASQAN will review the network design in the lower basin to determine if an additional monitoring station is needed further upstream to account for flow downstream of Falcon Reservoir.

Both water column and suspended sediment samples will be collected and analyzed at the fixed-network stations.  Field parameters such as stream discharge, water temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, and conductivity will be measured. Water samples will be analyzed for major ions, nutrients, trace metals, dissolved and suspended organic carbon, dissolved inorganic carbon, selected pesticides, and sediment concentration. Additionally, oxygen/deuterium and nitrogen isotope samples are collected for NRP. Suspended sediment samples will be collected at selected sites and analyzed for suspended trace elements.

Special studies in the Rio Grande Basin: Special studies in the Rio Grande Basin are designed to address issues and concerns that cannot be adequately characterized using the current fixed-station network of NASQAN. Concerns in the region include the increasing concentration of metals including arsenic and mercury, increasing salinity, and the presence of numerous pesticide and organic compounds, especially in the lower Rio Grande Valley.

An analysis of historical (1970’s to 1994) riverbed sediment data for the Rio Grande Basin showed increasing trends of mercury and selenium in the region between the Pecos River and Amistad International Reservoir. Sampling of Falcon and Amistad Reservoirs was conducted in FY2001 to assess the occurrence and distribution of total mercury and methylmercury in the water column and in fish tissue. Methylmercury, the most toxic form of mercury, is usually ingested and can affect the immune system and nervous system.  Elemental mercury may be found in higher concentrations in areas such as mining sites, but is not as toxic as methylmercury.  The sampling of the reservoirs and fish will provide additional information on the distribution and forms of mercury present in the Rio Grande Basin. NASQAN will provide $10,000 in FY 2002 to analyze the mercury data and publish the results of FY 2001 special study.

Drainage from abandoned mercury, silver, lead, and gold mines are a principal source of contaminants affecting the quality of the Rio Grande upstream of, and in, Big Bend National Park.  The presence of trace elements of concern including arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, selenium, silver, and thallium have been documented, as has increasing trends of mercury and zinc in the middle Rio Grande basin. In FY 2002, an assessment of the effects of historical mining on the middle Rio Grande is planned to take a closer look at the influence of abandoned mines on the quality of the soil, sediment, and water in middle Rio Grande Basin in and around Big Bend National Park in the United States and the adjacent Maderas del Carmen and Canon de Santa Elena Mexican Protected Areas in Mexico. As part of the assessment, soil samples will be collected from mine tailings in Mexico and the United States, water and sediment (bed and suspended) samples will be collected from tributaries in Mexico and the United States and from the Rio Grande. When possible, some sediment samples will be collected during or shortly after storm events in tributaries downstream of abandoned mines. The assessment will be conducted in cooperation with the National Park Service – Big Bend National Park, the Mexican Protected areas, the International Boundary and Water Commission, the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Part of the assessment will be funded by a $10,000 grant from the National Park Service’s United States-Mexico Affairs Office (MEAF). NASQAN will provide $40,000 for the trace metal special study in FY 2002.

Salinity continues to be of major concern throughout the Rio Grande Basin.  Extended periods of drought in recent years in conjunction with decreased inflows because of recently constructed reservoirs on watersheds in Mexico have contributed to increasing salinity levels in the middle Rio Grande Basin.  Researchers at the Texas A&M University Agricultural and Research Center at El Paso have shown that salinity is increasing in the region around Presidio at an annual rate of 15 to 18 mg/L. An assessment is planned in FY2003 to collect information on possible source(s) and distribution of salinity in the Rio Grande Basin. If feasible, a water-quality monitor will be installed to continuously monitor change in salinity in the Rio Grande or the Pecos River near Amistad Reservoir.

In FY 2004, NASQAN-Rio Grande special studies will take a more in-depth look at the presence and distribution of organic compounds and pesticides in the basin.  The Rio Grande is home to numerous parks and wildlife refuges (including Big Bend National Park, Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge, and Mexican Protected Areas) that compete for water with agricultural and industrial users in the region. Increasing urbanization in the basin has increased the use of pesticide and organic compounds.  The NASQAN program will look at the occurrence and distribution of these compounds, especially in the Lower Rio Grande Valley.

Yukon Basin

FY 2002 is the second year of the Yukon River NASQAN study. This year’s activities focus on two work elements: 1) operation of a fixed station network, and 2) synoptic sampling of a portion of the Yukon River (and its tributaries) from Eagle, AK to Stevens Village, AK.

 

Fixed Station Network: The fixed station network consists of 5 sites - 3 located along the mainstem of the Yukon River and 2 that drain major tributaries to the Yukon.

 

15356000 – Yukon River at Eagle, AK – 114,000 mi2. Represents about one third of the Yukon River Basin. Importance of the site is that it is located above the Yukon Flats, a large depositional area.

 

15453500 – Yukon River near Stevens Village, AK – 196,300 mi2. Located downstream of the Yukon Flats. Comparisons of fluxes at this site with the fluxes from sites upstream of Yukon Flats should indicate amount of deposition of various water quality constituents.

 

15565447 – Yukon River at Pilot Station, AK – 321,000 mi2.  Represents the mouth of the basin.

 

15389000 – Porcupine River near Fort Yukon, AK – 29,500 mi2. Drains a permafrost basin.

 

15515500 – Tanana River at Nenana, AK – 25,600 mi2. Drains a glacial basin.

 

Sampling frequency and constituents Each site is sampled 7 times, once in March (representing low flow conditions) and the remaining six times during the open water season, late May to September. Samples are analyzed for standard NASQAN constituents, suspended trace elements, and suspended sediment. In addition, samples are analyzed for specific NRP studies. These include mercury, radiochemistry, organic carbon, total and dissolved trace metals, carbon dioxide, methane, inorganic carbon, deuterium, and oxygen-18. (NASQAN contributes $50,000 to NRP in partial payment for these laboratory analyses and NRP personnel’s contributions to the Yukon study.)

 

Synoptic Sampling: Two synoptic sampling trips will be conducted along a portion of the Yukon River from Eagle, AK to Stevens Village, AK. These trips will take place in June and August in order to 1) characterize this section of the Yukon under different flow conditions and 2) determine instantaneous flux of major ions, nutrients, dissolved and suspended trace elements at a large number of points to determine important source areas and patterns of transport and fate.  Water quality samples will be collected both along the mainstem of the Yukon River and at major tributaries such as the Porcupine, Chandular, and Sheenjek Rivers. (NASQAN is contributing an additional $75,000; NRP is contributing $50,000, as well as a substantial commitment of NRP personnel and laboratory resources; and AK District has provided planning and support at no additional cost to NASQAN to accomplish this study.)

Columbia Basin

The scope of the NASQAN program in the Columbia River Basin for the period 2001-2005 is much reduced relative to 1996-2000, with sampling at only one index station, the Columbia River at Beaver Army Terminal near Quincy, Oregon (14246900).  Nonetheless, sampling at this station continues to be oriented toward the primary NASQAN program objective of characterizing fluxes of water and chemicals out of the basin to receiving waters, i.e. the Columbia River Estuary. One of the important water-quality issues in the Columbia Basin concerns the effect of toxic contaminants on wildlife, especially hydrophobic compounds that are predominantly transported in association with sediment particles.  Because of the high degree of flow regulation in the Columbia River, much of the sediment from the upper regions of the basin is deposited in main-stem reservoirs and does not reach the mouth of the river.  As a result, local sediment sources assume greater importance.  Of particular concern to wildlife in the Estuary is the influence of sediment input from the Willamette River, which is heavily influenced by agriculture and the major metropolitan area of Portland. 

 

The standard approach for flux determination in NASQAN is to develop a regression relationship between constituent concentration with streamflow and seasonal factors, as appropriate.  At this site, however, suspended sediment concentration exhibits a generally poor relation with streamflow because of extensive flow regulation upstream, and further weakened by tidal effects.  The influence of the Willamette also is a confounding factor, as it contributes a large proportion of the total water and sediment flux during winter storms when flow is relatively low in the main-stem Columbia River.  Given the concern about delivery to the Estuary of sediment-associated toxic contaminants, the Columbia Basin NASQAN program is augmenting the routine sampling program with a special turbidity study during 2001-2005.  The objectives of the special study are as follows:

 

·                     To improve estimates of sediment delivery to the Columbia River Estuary through the use of in-situ turbidity measurements as a surrogate for suspended sediment concentration

·                     To evaluate the influence of the Willamette River as a source of estimated sediment loads to the main-stem Columbia River

 

The general approach of the special study will be to explore the relation of turbidity and suspended sediment concentration, in context with other relevant factors.  Two continuous nephelometric turbidity sensors have been deployed at the site, co-located with a side-scan Doppler unit monitoring streamflow velocity.  Sampling includes a mix of water-quality and field-calibration samples, totaling 15-17 site visits per year. 

Data will be used to fine-tune the regression model for estimating loads of suspended sediment, and, if possible, to estimate the percent of silt-sized and smaller particles.  Results will analyzed to determine the governing factors for sediment delivery to the Columbia River Estuary, especially the effect of Willamette River inputs.   (NASQAN is providing $20,000 for this study.)

Colorado Basin

Two index stations will be operated in the Colorado Basin (Colorado River above Diamond Creek and Colorado River at Northerly International Boundary), the same as last year. Sampling at the compact point (Colorado River at Lees Ferry) is supported through the cooperative program. No special studies or interpretive reports are planned for FY 2002.

Other Special Studies

1.       Richard Vogel (Tufts University) is extending his work on estimating the precision of load estimates to include estimating loads at ungaged sites. ($10,000)

2.       Art Horowitz (GA District) is preparing a report on the effects of length of record on load estimates. ($15,000)

3.       Art Horowitz (GA District) is performing a holding time test for unpreserved large volume samples to determine changes in particulate C, N and P values. ($10,000)

 

NASQAN Contact Information

For any questions on the NASQAN program, consult our web page (http://water.usgs.gov/nasqan) or contact any of the following individuals:

·         National Coordinator: Rick Hooper, Office of Water Quality, Northborough, MA. rphooper@usgs.gov; 508-490-5065

·         Mississippi Basin Coordinator: Richard Coupe, MS District, Pearl, MS. rhcoupe@usgs.gov;
601-933-2982

·         Rio Grande Basin Coordinator: Becky Lambert, TX District, San Antonio, TX. blambert@usgs.gov; 210-691-9218

·         Colorado Basin Coordinator: Bob Hart, AZ District, Tucson, AZ. bhart@usgs.gov; 520-556-7137

·         Columbia Basin Coordinator: Valerie Kelly, OR District, Corvallis, OR. vjkelly@usgs.gov;
541-754-4784

·         Yukon Basin Coordinator: Tim Brabets, AK District, Anchorage, AK. tbrabets@usgs.gov;
907-786-7105

 

 

 

Stephen K. Sorenson

Acting Chief, Office of Water Quality

 

This memorandum supersedes OWQ Technical Memorandum 2001.01.

 

Distribution:       A, B, DC, AO, District and Regional Water-Quality Specialists


Attachment 1. FY 2002 NASQAN Stations

Station ID

Name

District

Fixed Samples

Planned Event

Replicates

Sediment Chemistry

Mississippi Basin

03086000

Ohio R @ Sewickley, PA

PA

12

3

3

15

03216600

Ohio R@Greenup Dam

KY

12

3

3

0

03303280

Ohio R@Cannelton

KY

12

3

3

0

03378500

Wabash R@New Harmony

KY

12

3

3

0

*

Cumberland R@ Smithland

KY

6

0

1

6

03609750

Tennessee R @ Paducah

KY

6

0

1

4

03612500

Ohio R nr Gr. Chain

KY

12

3

3

4

05420500

Mississippi R@Clinton

IA

10

3

3

4

06185500

Missouri R nr Culbertson

MT

6

3

2

0

06338490

Missouri R@Garrison Dam

ND

6

0

1

0

06467500

Missouri R@ Yankton

SD

8

0

1

0

06610000

Missouri R@Omaha

IA

12

3

3

0

06934500

Missouri R@Hermann

MO

12

3

3

4

07022000

Mississippi R@Thebes

MO

12

3

3

4

07263620

Ark. R@D.Terry Dam

AR

10

0

2

4

07373420

Mississippi R@St. Francisville

LA

12

3

3

4

07381495

Atchafalaya R @Melville

LA

12

3

3

4

Rio Grande Basin

08374200

Rio Grande blw Presidio

TX

8

0

1

8

08377200

Rio Grande@Foster Ranch

TX

8

0

1

4

08447410

Pecos R. nr. Langtry

TX

8

0

1

0

08450900

Rio G. blw Amistad Res

TX

6

0

1

0

08459200

Rio Grande@Laredo

TX

10

0

2

7

08461300

Rio Grande bl Falcon Dam

TX

6

0

1

0

08470400

Arroyo Colorado nr Harlingen

TX

10

0

2

7

08475000

Rio Grande nr Brownsville

TX

0

5

1

0

Colorado Basin

09404200

Colorado R@Diamond CK

AZ

8

0

1

8

09522000

Colorado R @NIB

AZ

6

0

1

4

Columbia Basin

14246900

Columbia R@Beaver Army

OR

8

0

1

4

Yukon Basin

15356000

Yukon R@ Eagle

AK

6

1

1

7

15389000

Porcupine R nr Ft Yukon

AK

6

1

1

7

15453500

Yukon R@ Stevens Village

AK

6

1

1

7

15515500

Tanana R @ Nenana

AK

5

2

1

7

15565447

Yukon R @ Pilot Station

AK

6

1

1

7

*Station number not yet assigned.


Attachment 2. FY 2002 Funding Allocations by Station and Account Number

Station ID

Account Number

District

Fixed Sampling Cost

Gaging Cost

Total Initial Transfer

Event Sampling Reserve

Eastern Region

03216600

4421-00300

KY

 $     58,593

 $            -  

 

 $     13,902

03303280

4421-00300

KY

 $     46,881

 $     11,450

 

 $     10,974

03378500

4421-00300

KY

 $     51,006

 $            -  

 

 $     11,955

03410500

4421-00300

KY

 $     25,420

 $            -  

 

 $            -  

03609750

4421-00300

KY

 $     24,704

 $            -  

 

 $            -  

03612500

4421-00300

KY

 $     47,794

 $     11,450

 

 $     10,944

TOTAL

4421-00300

KY

 

 

 $   277,298

 

03086000

4442-00350

PA

 $     40,716

 $            -  

 $     40,716

 $       7,476

Central Region

07263620

4605-00300

AR

 $     29,614

 $       4,725

 $     34,339

 $            -  

05420500

4619-00307

IA

 $     35,243

 $            -  

 $     35,243

 $       9,627

06610000

4619-00303

IA

 $     53,262

 $            -  

 $     53,262

 $     12,600

07373420

4622-00304

LA

 $     61,838

 $            -  

 

 $     14,455

07381495

4622-00304

LA

 $     62,164

 $            -  

 

 $     14,455

TOTAL

4622-00304

LA

 

 

 $   124,002

 

06934500

4629-00300

MO

 $     51,506

 $       5,450

 

 $     12,216

07022000

4629-00300

MO

 $     72,458

 $            -  

 

 $     17,454

TOTAL

4629-00300

 

 

 

 $   129,414

 

06185500

4630-00300

MT

 $     19,830

 $            -  

 $     19,830

 $       8,700

06338490

4638-00300

ND

 $     18,202

 $            -  

 $     18,202

 $            -  

06467500

4646-00320

SD

 $     38,384

 $       1,000

 $     39,384

 $            -  

08377200

4648-00330

TX

 $     28,454

 $            -  

 

 $            -  

08447410

4648-00330

TX

 $     27,414

 $            -  

 

 $            -  

08450900

4648-00330

TX

 $     17,812

 $            -  

 

 $            -  

TOTAL

4648-00330

TX

 

 

 $     73,680

 

08374200

4648-00331

TX

 $     16,670

 $            -  

 

 $            -  

08459200

4648-00331

TX

 $     38,962

 $            -  

 

 $            -  

08461300

4648-00331

TX

 $     21,222

 $            -  

 

 $            -  

08470400

4648-00331

TX

 $     39,372

 $            -  

 

 $            -  

08475000

4648-00331

TX

 $            -  

 $            -  

 

 $     17,160

TOTAL

4648-00331

TX

 

 

 $   116,226

 

Western Region

15356000

4702-00351

AK

 $     65,170

 $            -  

 

 $     10,560

15389000

4702-00351

AK

 $     60,830

 $            -  

 

 $       8,720

15453500

4702-00351

AK

 $     39,278

 $            -  

 

 $       5,128

15515500

4702-00351

AK

 $     21,505

 $            -  

 

 $       7,878

15565447

4702-00351

AK

 $     69,160

 $            -  

 

 $     11,225

TOTAL

4702-00351

AK

 

 

 $   255,943

 

09404200

4704-00320

AZ

 $     31,364

 $            -  

 $     31,364

 $            -  

09522000

4704-00350

AZ

 $     20,766

 $            -  

 $     20,766

 $            -  

14246900

4741-00332

OR

 $     22,488

 $            -  

 $     22,488

 $            -