INFORMATION - Good Friday Earthquake effects


               UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
                          GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
                      WATER RESOURCES DIVISION
                         WASHINGTON 25, D. C.

                                                    June 2, 1964

Reply requested by June 15, 1964

GROUND WATER BRANCH MEMORANDUM NO. 64.35

To:       District Chiefs and Staff Officials (GW)

From:     Chief, Ground Water Branch

Subject:  INFORMATION - Good Friday Earthquake effects

Because of its relative nearness and its unusually large (8.4)
magnitude, the Good Friday earthquake in Alaska, on March 27,
1964, has probably created more interesting hydrologic side
effects in the United States than any other earthquake of this
century.  For this reason it seems highly desirable to gather
observations of these phenomena, summarize them and publish them
as a unit.

With the above as the general aim, we would appreciate receiving
any additional data, records, newspaper articles, eye-witness
accounts, photographs, etc., of the earthquake effects in your
area.  Please also include copies of the measurable recorder
charts for wells, streams, springs, lakes or bayous that were
affected by the quake as well as pertinent geohydrologic data,
such as geologic formation, depth of wells, or size of open water
bodies affected.

Many of you already have had some of your observations published
by newspapers (and have sent us copies or clippings).  Others may
want to use the assembled data as a basis for a local press
release.  Perhaps, too, you may want to consider releasing the
data in a more formal local publication such as an information
circular or a report of investigation.  Such efforts, if made, are
all to the good and would give one of your personnel a chance to
publish a report, as well as make the data available for a
national summary.  In any case, they hydrologic side effects are
of such widespread interest that they justify serious attention to
them.  Also, it is hoped that study of these effects will provide
further knowledge of the relatively unknown borderland between
hydrology and seismology.

The prompt action on the part of field personnel in collecting and
releasing to the press information about the Alaskan Quake is
greatly appreciated.  From the clippings furnished to us, it
appears that the press coverage was both widespread and excellent.

All information supplied in response to this memorandum should be
sent to:

               R. C. Vorhis
               U.S. Geological Survey
               Rm. 416
               19 Hunter Street, SW
               Atlanta, Georgia  30303



                                   (s) O. M. Hackett

WRD Distribution:  A, B3, S3, FO-3, SL